Julie United States Leave a Comment

While hiking to Mt Ida, you really feel like you are walking on top of the world. For much of this hike you walk along the Continental Divide, so you have panoramic views across the park. It gets even better once you reach the summit of Mt Ida. From here, at an elevation of 12,899 feet, the entire park stretches out before you.

This hike is much different than many others in Rocky Mountain National Park. You spend very little time below the tree line, so you get sweeping views for most of the hike. And since this is a lesser known hike, you will share the trail with fewer people than many other hikes in the park.

But this is a tough hike. It starts at 10,797 feet and tops out at 12,899 on Mt Ida, so you will really feel the effects of the higher elevation. Expect lots of wind and cold temperatures, even during the summer months. Hikers need to keep a close eye on weather conditions. This is a terrible trail to be caught in a thunderstorm, since you are so exposed.

This is one of our favorite hikes in Rocky Mountain National Park and we highly recommend it if you want unforgettable high alpine views. Just come prepared, bring warm clothing, and start early to avoid those typical summer afternoon thunderstorms.

Facts About the Hike

Distance: 9.8 miles
Difficulty: Strenuous
Total Elevation Gain: 3,060 feet
Starting Elevation: 10,797 feet (trailhead)
Highest Elevation: 12,899 (Mt Ida)
Length of Time: 4.5 to 6.5 hours

How to Hike Mt Ida

Getting to the Trailhead

The trailhead is located on Highway 34, 4.5 miles southwest of the Alpine Visitor Center.

Park at the small parking lot at Milner Pass/Poudre Lake. This lot can hold approximately 22 cars. We arrived at 7 am on July 1 and got one of the last spaces.

There are two pit toilets here.

The trail starts next to Lake Poudre, on the northern end of the parking lot.

Poudre Lake

The view from the first part of the trail, looking back at Lake Poudre and the start of the hike.

Hiking to Mt Ida

The trail briefly skirts around the southern end of Lake Poudre and then heads into the trees. This first section of trail is one of the hardest and least exciting sections of the hike. You steadily gain elevation with very little to look at, other than the evergreen forest. But that is about to change.

First Part of the Trail

Just over 0.5 miles into the hike you will arrive at a trail junction. Stay to the right to continue to Mt Ida (follow signs for Mt Ida).

Mt Ida Sign

At about 1 mile into the hike, the trail emerges from the trees and the views really open up. To your right are the Never Summer Mountains. Out in front of you, you will be able to see the peak of Mt Ida.

First View from the Trail

The Never Summer Mountains

 

Trail to Mt Ida

Mt Ida is the tallest peak off in the distance.

 

Looking Back at the Trail

This photo is taken farther into the hike. Now, you are looking back at the trail and the Never Summer Mountains.

While hiking this trail, it’s possible to see bighorn sheep and elk. We didn’t get so lucky, but there are also quite a few marmots who call this area home.

Marmot on the Rocks

Marmots

At this point, you are hiking through subalpine tundra. On the day we did this, the winds were relentless and very strong. We later talked to a park ranger who stated that this is quite normal for this hike.

Pro Travel Tip: Even during the summer months, I recommend packing a hat, gloves, and several layers of clothing. The temperature gauge in our car read 37°F at 7:30 am. With the high winds and the high elevation, we experienced freezing temperatures for most of our hike, on July 1.

For the most part, it is a steady uphill hike to get to Mt Ida, with a few nice downhill sections.

The hardest part of the hike is the final summit of Mt Ida. This climb starts 3.5 miles into the hike. You will steadily climb up through a field of boulders. There is a faint trail to follow, but you will really have to pay attention, because it is sketchy at times.

Tim in Boulder Field

Tim hiking up through the boulder field.

This part of the hike is hard. By this point, you have already been hiking for several hours, battling the wind and the altitude, so you will feel fatigued at this point. Take your time and stop to take a break when you need it.

But once up on top of Mt Ida, all of your effort pays off. The views are astonishing and this was one of my favorite views after six days of hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park.

From the top of Mt Ida, you have 360° views of RMNP. To the west are the Never Summer mountains. To the north is the Mummy mountain range and Trail Ridge Road. To the southeast you can see Longs Peak. To the southwest is Grand Lake. And just below Mt Ida is Inkwell Lake and Azure Lake.

Earth Trekkers RMNP

Mt Ida Panorama

Panorama from the summit of Mt Ida.

 View from Mt Ida

The view south from Mt Ida. Off in the distance you can see Grand Lake.

 

Mt Ida View

The view over Inkwell and Azure Lakes. Alpine Ridge Road runs along the peaks off in the distance.

On the day we did this, miraculously, there was very little wind on top of Mt Ida. We took our photos, ate an early lunch, and watched the marmots scurrying around the rocks (don’t feed the wildlife…this is part of the seven principles of Leave No Trace).

To get back to your car, retrace your steps. It’s a mostly downhill walk back to the trailhead, but the few short uphill climbs along the way add up to about 475 feet of elevation gain on the return hike.

One of the great things about this hike are the incredible views. I think that the views are better on the walk back to Milner Pass than on the way to Mt Ida. Some out-and-back hikes can be boring on the way back, repeating the same views, but not this one. Plus, now that it is mostly downhill walk, it is easier to enjoy those spectacular views.

Top of the Trail

Tyler and Kara Mt Ida

View of the Trail Mt Ida

If you look closely, you can see the trail heading across the plateau.

 

Rocky Mountain National Park Hike

Tips to Have the Best Experience

Start the hike early, ideally by 7 am. During the summer months, afternoon thunderstorms are common, typically occurring at 2 pm. You need to be below the tree line by 2 pm.

Leave no trace. When you are in the park, practice the seven principles of Leave No Trace. This includes packing out what you bring into the park, be considerate of other hikers, stay on the trail, and do not remove anything from the park.

Do not expect your cell phone to work. During most of this hike we had no cellular service (this also goes for the drive along Highway 34). There were a few spots here and there where we got a few bars of LTE or 3G, just enough to send a text message. The best cellular service was on top of Mt Ida. Don’t depend on your phone to call for help, talk to friends, or send photos to friends and family.

Be prepared to turn around early. If weather conditions change and you see approaching thunderstorms, be prepared to end your hike before you reach Mt Ida. Your safety is more important than making it to the lake.

If you are not acclimated to the altitude, this is not a good first hike in Rocky Mountain National Park. The long distance, elevation gain, and altitude make this a tough hike. If you have not already spent time in Colorado adjusting to the altitude, I recommend that you spend at least two days acclimating to the higher elevation.

Continental Divide Trail

What to Bring on the Hike

Hiking shoes. Don’t do this hike in anything other than hiking shoes or hiking boots.

Hiking poles. Hiking poles take the stress off of your legs and help to ease leg pain and fatigue.

Water and snacks. At least 3 liters of water in the summer.

Sunscreen, hat, and sunglasses. For much of the hike you will be above the trees, in direct sunlight.

Camera. Even a smartphone will do. For great photos of the Never Summer mountains and the views from the top of Mt Ida, use the panorama feature of your smartphone.

Warm clothing. Bring a hat and gloves. A rain jacket or windbreaker is great for this hike. And wear several layers of clothing, even in the summer.

If you are new to hiking or are curious about what you should bring on a hike, check out our Hiking Gear Guide. Find out what we carry in our day packs and what we wear on the trails.


If you have any questions about hiking to Mt Ida, let us know in the comment section below. Happy hiking!!

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Continental Divide Trail RMNP

 

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